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CONTACT THE PORT OF DOVER

Harbour House
Marine Parade
Dover
CT17 9BU
  Tel: +44 (0) 1304 240 400

For all lost property enquires, please contact:

  Tel: +44 (0) 1304 245 392
  Email: property.office@doverport.co.uk

 

CONTACT MEDIA

For all media enquiries, please contact the Corporate Affairs team:

  TEL: +44 (0) 1304 240 400 Ext. 4410
  E-mail: communications@doverport.co.uk

Or: John Stevenson at T&I Communications

      TEL: +44 (0) 7824 621 756 
  E-mail: john@ti-communications.co.uk

 

CONTACT POLICE

The Port of Dover Police can be contacted 24 hours a day and 365 days of the year, please contact:

Port of Dover Police
Floor 4. Terminal Control Building,
Eastern Docks,
Dover, Kent,
CT16 1JA

  TEL: +44 (0) 1304 216 084
  FAX: +44 (0) 1304 241 956
  E-mail: police@doverport.co.uk

NO-DEAL BREXIT GUIDANCE

 

New rules will apply to all travel between the UK and France in a No-Deal. Most drivers of lorries and cars travelling through Dover will need to carry new documents. See our guidance for an outline of the new requirements and how you can prepare.

BE PREPARED. BE GOOD to GO.

BREXIT FOR TOURISTS

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, you may need new documents next time you travel to France. If your passport is due to expire soon, you may need to get a new one. And you will almost certainly need new documents if you are driving or taking your pet with you. You will need to obtain these new documents before you get to the port.

See below for more details, and also for information on customs allowances (including 'duty-free') and on what to do if you experience a delay in travelling to Dover.




 

 

Passports

If you are travelling to France on a UK passport, your passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of your outbound sailing from Dover. Any extension to the validity of your passport beyond its original expiry date does not count. There is a useful online tool to check if your UK passport will still be valid for when you want to travel.

Holders of UK passports will not need a visa to travel to France or its neighbouring countries for a holiday or short visit.

If you are travelling to France on any other passport or on an ID card issued by an EU country, existing requirements (including any visa requirement) will continue to apply.

If you are travelling to the UK, whatever your nationality, existing requirements will continue to apply. Citizens of EU countries will not need a visa to enter the UK, and may continue to travel on their ID cards as an alternative to their passports.

Passport controls will continue to be carried out before you embark on your ferry. So, when travelling to France, your passport (or ID card) will be checked by the French Police aux Frontières in Dover; and when travelling to the UK, your passport (or ID card) will be checked by the Border Force in Calais or Dunkirk.

Driving licences

Holders of a UK driving licence may need an International Driving Permit to drive in the EU. This is not yet certain but, to be on the safe side, you may wish to obtain an International Driving Permit before you travel.

International Driving Permits are available over the counter from Post Offices across the UK, so you can obtain yours close to home in the days before you travel. There is no Post Office at the port, but both branches in Dover town and the branch at Whitfield (just off the penultimate roundabout on the A2 before you reach the port) issue International Driving Permits.

When applying for an International Driving Permit, you should state which countries you will be driving in – because there are three different types of International Driving Permit, and the one you need will depend on where you will be driving.

Holders of an EU driving licence will not need an International Driving Permit to drive in the UK. You will continue to be permitted to drive in the UK using just your EU driving licence.

Motor insurance

If you are taking a car to France, you should obtain a “Green Card” from your insurance provider. UK motor insurance will continue to cover you for driving in the EU, but you may be asked to show the Green Card to demonstrate that you are insured. You should contact your insurance company directly in order to get one.

The requirement to obtain a Green Card ought to be short-lived. The EU is required by its own law (Article 8 of Directive 2009/103/EC) to disapply the Green Card requirement for cars insured in the UK, but is free to choose when to do so.

Customs allowances

Shopping - whether for treats for yourself, gifts for others, or simply to stock up the larder - is an important part of the holiday experience. Brexit will not change what you can buy abroad, but it will make a difference to the arrangements for taking it home, especially if you are returning to the Continent after a visit to the UK.

When travelling to France, usual duty-free allowances will apply. Every adult passenger will be able to carry, in your luggage or your car:

• 200 cigarettes (or 100 cigarillos, or 50 cigars, or 250g of loose tobacco), and
• 1 litre of spirits (or 2 litres of fortified wine), and
• 4 litres of still wine, and
• 16 litres of beer, and
• up to €430 worth of other items

You are free to carry more than your duty-free allowance but, if you do, you will be required to declare it to French Customs on arrival in France, and you may be required to pay tax on it. (French Customs will tell you how much.)

When travelling to the UK, you may continue to bring back as many purchases from the EU as you can carry without having to declare them or pay any UK duty or tax, as long as the goods are for your personal use. (Personal use includes giving something away as a gift as well as eating, drinking, smoking or using it yourself.)

Customs controls will continue to take place after disembarkation. On arrival in Dover from France, all cars should continue to drive through the Customs checkpoint without stopping, unless directed to stop by a Border Force or Police officer.

If you are stopped and your car is searched, the Border Force will continue to use its “indicative levels” (90 litres of wine, 800 cigarettes, 1kg of loose tobacco, etc) as a guide to whether the amount of goods you are carrying is likely to be for your personal use or not.

Long-standing prohibitions, of items such as offensive weapons and illegal drugs, will continue to apply.

Pet travel

You will still be able to travel through Dover with your pet dog or cat (or ferret!) after Brexit, but existing UK pet passports will cease to be valid.

Instead, if you are travelling to France, you will need to obtain a new health certificate for your pet. As now, your pet will need to be microchipped and vaccinated against rabies. Your pet will also need to have a blood test (if it has not had one previously) that shows the vaccine to have been successful. For more information, see this guidance or contact your vet.

Each health certificate will be valid for one return trip across the Channel: it will enable your pet to re-enter the UK when you return at the end of your trip (though your dog will, as now, need to be treated for tapeworm before you leave France), but you would need to get another certificate for any subsequent trip to France.

If you live on the Continent and are planning to travel to the UK with your dog or cat, you can use an EU pet passport, as you would now. The pet passport will also be valid for your pet’s return journey to France, but you should check that your pet has had a blood test showing that its rabies vaccine had been successful.

These requirements should be short-lived. The EU has simpler requirements for pets from countries that are listed as rabies-free. The UK is rabies-free, but the EU has yet to list it as such.

Delays on the roads

The Port of Dover works hard to ensure that all passengers can get through the port quickly and efficiently. Queues do still occur from time to time, especially at busy bank holiday weekends and at the start of school holidays.

If you are caught in traffic and are concerned that you may miss your booked sailing, you should contact your ferry operator directly. Make sure, when you set off on your journey, that you have their contact number handy.

BREXIT FOR COMMERCIAL VEHICLES

New customs rules will apply to freight traffic after Brexit.  The most obvious change will be at check-in, both in Dover or in Calais or Dunkirk.  The driver of every freight vehicles will have to:

  • Show a customs document (usually bearing a barcode) at the check-in; OR
  • Declare at check-in that the vehicle is empty.

If you are sending a laden lorry or van to Dover after Brexit, you will need to ensure that the driver has a customs document for the load before he reaches the port.  The customs document may differ, depending on the purpose for which the goods are being moved – the various scenarios are outlined below.  But unless the vehicle is empty, the driver must have at least one customs document.

The document will demonstrate that the goods have been declared to customs.  After Brexit, all goods must be declared to customs before crossing the Channel in either direction.  The driver himself is not responsible for declaring the goods in his vehicle, but he will need to show a document to demonstrate that someone else (usually the exporter and/or importer) has declared them.

After check-in, the journey through Dover will be the same as it is now.  Logistics managers and drivers themselves can look forward to the usual swift and efficient transit through the port and high standard of service on board the ship.


 

Exports to France via Dover in a lorry

Exports from the UK to France must receive export clearance in the UK and must be pre-declared for importation into France before the lorry reaches Dover.  These are two separate processes, and you will need to arrange for two separate documents to be given to the driver when he collects the goods from the exporter’s premises:

  1. An export accompanying document showing that the goods have received export clearance (“Permission to Progress”, or “P2P”) from HMRC; AND
  2. A customs document issued by French Customs showing that the goods have been pre-declared for importation into France.  This document will bear a barcode.
The driver will not usually be asked to show the export accompanying document at Dover.  If he is stopped for a security examination by the Border Force, he should be ready to produce it on request.

The driver must show the French Customs document to his ferry operator at check-in in Dover.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the lorry will proceed through the port to the ship.

Screens on board the ship will show whether each lorry has been cleared to drive straight out of the port on arrival (green) or has been selected for examination (amber).  Drivers should consult the screens during the voyage, and follow the appropriate signs on disembarkation.

Exports to France via Dover in your own van

Exports from the UK to France must receive export clearance in the UK and must be pre-declared for importation into France before the van reaches Dover.  These are two separate processes.

The French importation process for goods in a van is the same as for goods in a lorry.  HMRC has a special export declaration process for van traffic (where the value of goods in the van is less than £900), recognising that many smaller vans are operated by owner/drivers:

  • Export clearance for vanloads of goods, where the total value is less than £900, can be obtained online [details to follow];
  • Export clearance for vanloads of goods, where the value exceeds £900, should be obtained in the same way as for a lorry.


You will need to arrange for two separate documents to be given to the driver when he collects the goods from the exporter’s premises:

  1. Some document that showing that the goods have received export clearance (“Permission to Progress”, or “P2P”) from HMRC: either -
    a screenshot of the online declaration, OR -
    an Export Accompanying Document; AND
  2. A customs document issued by French Customs showing that the goods have been pre-declared for importation into France.  This document will bear a barcode.

The driver will not usually be asked to show the HMRC export document at Dover.  If he is stopped for a security examination by the Border Force, he should be ready to produce it on request.

The driver must show the French Customs document to his ferry operator at check-in in Dover.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the van will proceed through the port to the ship.

Screens on board the ship will show whether each van has been cleared to drive straight out of the port on arrival (green) or has been selected for examination (amber).  Drivers should consult the screens during the voyage, and follow the appropriate signs on disembarkation.

Transit movements (including TIR) to the Continent via Dover in a lorry or a van

Many goods carried from the UK to France will be moving under Transit (either Common Transit or TIR), so that all customs formalities are performed inland, away from the port.  This will include almost all “landbridge” journeys across the UK between the Republic of Ireland and the Continent, and many more lorries and vans destined for delivery addresses beyond France.

The transit movement will be initiated either at the premises where the driver collects the goods or at a customs office on his way to the port.  When this happens, a Transit Accompanying Document is issued and must be given to the driver.  The driver must carry this document in his cab until he delivers the goods at their ultimate destination.

At check-in in Dover, the driver must show the Transit Accompanying Document to the ferry operator.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the vehicle will proceed through the port to the ship.

Screens on board the ship will show whether each vehicle has been cleared to drive straight out of the port on arrival (green) or has been selected for examination (amber).  Transit movements will usually be given a green light.  Drivers should consult the screens during the voyage, and follow the appropriate signs on disembarkation.


 

Temporary shipments to the Continent via Dover in a lorry or a van

Goods being taken out of the UK temporarily (such as exhibition goods, racing cars and other sporting equipment for events, music stages and instruments for concert tours, etc) or returning to the Continent after an event in the UK will travel under a carnet document.  This acts a temporary “customs passport”.

Carnet documents must be stamped by Customs before the vehicle reaches the port.  The driver should then carry the stamped carnet in his cab throughout his journey.

At check-in in Dover, the driver must show the stamped carnet to the ferry operator.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the vehicle will proceed through the port to the ship.

Screens on board the ship will show whether each vehicle has been cleared to drive straight out of the port on arrival (green) or has been selected for examination (amber).  Carnet movements will usually be given a green light.  Drivers should consult the screens during the voyage, and follow the appropriate signs on disembarkation.

Imports from France via Dover in a lorry

Imports from France to the UK must receive export clearance in France and must be pre-declared for importation into the UK before the lorry reaches Calais or Dunkirk.  These are two separate processes, and you will need to arrange for two separate documents to be given to the driver when he collects the goods from the exporter’s premises in France:

  1. An export accompanying document showing that the goods have received export clearance from French Customs; this document will bear a barcode; AND
  2. A document showing a reference number for HMRC (this will either be a Master Reference Number for a declaration or the importer’s Customs Reference, or “EORI”, Number).

At check-in in Calais or Dunkirk, the driver must show the French Customs document to his ferry operator.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the lorry will proceed through the port to the ship.

On disembarkation in Dover, the driver should drive straight out of the port unless directed, at the Border Force customs control point, to pull into an examination area.  The driver should be ready to produce the document showing the HMRC reference number if asked to do so during an examination.

Imports from France via Dover in your own van

Imports from France to the UK must receive export clearance in France and must be pre-declared for importation into the UK before the van reaches Calais or Dunkirk.  These are two separate processes.

The French export process for goods in a van is the same as for goods in a lorry.  HMRC has a special process for declaring van traffic, recognising that many smaller vans are operated by owner/drivers:

  • Declarations for vanloads of goods, where the total value is less than £900, can be made online [details to follow];
  • Declarations for vanloads of goods, where the total value is between £900 and £9,000, can be made by email using a completed C88 form [details to follow];


You will need to arrange for two separate documents to be given to the driver when he collects the goods from the exporter’s premises in France:

  1. An export accompanying document showing that the goods have received export clearance from French Customs; this document will bear a barcode; AND
  2. A screenshot of the online declaration to HMRC, or a document showing the reference number issued by HMRC as a receipt for the emailed C88

At check-in in Calais or Dunkirk, the driver must show the French Customs document to his ferry operator.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the van will proceed through the port to the ship.

On disembarkation in Dover, the driver should drive straight out of the port unless directed, at the Border Force customs control point, to pull into an examination area.  The driver should be ready to produce the document showing the HMRC reference number, print-out or note of a telephone declaration, if asked to do so during an examination.

Transit movements (including TIR) from the Continent via Dover in a lorry or a van

Many goods carried from France to the UK will be moving under Transit (either Common Transit or TIR), so that all customs formalities are performed inland, away from the port.  This will include almost all “landbridge” journeys across the UK between the Continent and the Republic of Ireland, and many more lorries and vans carrying goods from countries beyond France.

The transit movement will be initiated either at the premises where the driver collects the goods or at a customs office on his way to the port.  When this happens, a Transit Accompanying Document is issued and must be given to the driver.  The driver must carry this document in his cab until he delivers the goods at their ultimate destination.

At check-in in Calais or Dunkirk, the driver must show the Transit Accompanying Document to the ferry operator.  The ferry operator will scan the barcode, and then give the document back to the driver.  When check-in is complete, the vehicle will proceed through the port to the ship.

On disembarkation in Dover, the driver should drive straight out of the port unless directed, at the Border Force customs control point, to pull into an examination area.  The driver should be ready to produce the Transit Accompanying Document if asked to do so during an examination.

 

Temporary shipments from the Continent via Dover in a lorry or a van

Goods being brought into the UK temporarily (such as exhibition goods, racing cars and other sporting equipment for events, music stages and instruments for concert tours, etc) or returning to the UK after an event on the Continent will travel under a carnet document.  This acts a temporary “customs passport”.

Carnet documents must be stamped by Customs before the vehicle arrives at Calais or Dunkirk.  The driver should then carry the stamped carnet in his cab throughout his journey.

At check-in in Calais or Dunkirk, the driver must show the stamped carnet to the ferry operator.  When check-in is complete, the vehicle will proceed through the port to the ship.

On disembarkation in Dover, the driver should drive straight out of the port unless directed, at the Border Force customs control point, to pull into an examination area.  The driver should be ready to produce the stamped carnet if asked to do so during an examination.

Empty lorries or vans

No customs paperwork is required for empty lorries or vans.  Customs controls apply only to goods: if there are no goods inside the vehicle, there are no customs controls.

At check-in in Dover (if travelling out to France) or in Calais or Dunkirk (if travelling in to the UK), the driver will need to inform the ferry operator that his vehicle is empty.  When check-in is complete, the vehicle will proceed through the port to the ship.

On disembarkation after the voyage, the driver should drive straight out of the port unless directed to stop.

Animal And/Or Plant Health Controls

The check-in process will be the same, regardless of the nature of the goods in the vehicle.  Some goods, such as food, will be subject to animal and/or plant health controls as well as customs controls, but the driver will not need to produce any health certificates for these goods in Dover.  At check-in, the driver should simply inform the ferry operator if his vehicle contains live animals, animal products, fish or plant products.

All animal and plant health controls on goods arriving in Dover from the EU will be performed inland, either at the importer’s premises or another inland site.  The importer will be required to notify the appropriate UK agency that his goods are arriving.  This notification process is separate from the transport of the goods, and imposes no obligation on the driver or operator of the vehicle.

Animal and plant health controls on goods leaving Dover for France will be performed in Calais or Dunkirk.  Vehicles containing goods that require animal and/or plant health controls will be shown on the amber (“selected for examination”) list on the screens on board the ship.  After disembarkation in Calais or Dunkirk, drivers should follow the appropriate signs to the examination area.

Wherever animal or plant health examinations are performed – either inland (in the UK) or at the port (in France) – a health certificate will be needed: a Common Veterinary Entry Document for animal products, or a Common Entry Document for plant products. The most reliable way to ensure that the certificate is available is for the driver to carry it in his lorry.

So, if you are despatching a lorry that contains animal or plant products, you should ensure that the driver has the necessary health certificate. You should also ensure that the lorry is sealed and that the number of the seal is recorded on the certificate, so that the certificate can be matched to the lorry during the examination.

Drivers' Personal Possessions

New limits will apply to the personal possessions which drivers may carry in their vehicles, in addition to the bans on certain items (drugs and offensive weapons) that already apply.  A driver carrying personal possessions in excess of these limits will be required to declare them.

Drivers departing from Dover for France will be limited, on arrival in Calais or Dunkirk, to 200 cigarettes, 1 litre of spirits, 4 litres of wine, 16 litres of beer and up to €430 of other items.  If the driver is carrying more than €10,000 in cash on arrival in Calais or Dunkirk he will be required to declare it.

The UK Government has stated that there will be no limit on what any individual may bring into to the UK from the EU with them for their personal use.  However, any driver carrying more than £10,000 when arriving in Dover will be required to declare it. 

Passport controls will continue to happen before crossing the Channel.  There will be no practical change to the checks carried out by the UK Border Force: drivers will continue to show a passport or an ID card, and drivers will be automatically admitted to the UK.  The French Government has not announced any change in the checks carried out in Dover by the Police aux Frontières.
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